give and take

happiness

Are you a taker, matcher or giver?

Yes, I am a matcher most of the time, unfortunately, and sometimes a taker or a giver. I feel the need to get evolved to be a giver after reading the book Give and Take by Adam Grant as giving wisely makes life happier. Yes, it takes actions and time to be a generous giver so it’s better that we really enjoy the process of giving. I’m trying to get there although I’m still far from the end of evolution.

How to be a cheerful giver?

Givers are generous folks who take other’s interests above theirs. Not many people can do that all the time I guess. I hope you’re one of the cheerful givers and I hope I can be one soon. Adam Grant advocates giving as he loves to see more successful givers getting to the top without cutting others down, finding ways of expanding the pie that benefit themselves and the people around them.

“When you meet people, regardless of who they are, you should be asking yourself, ‘How can I help the other person?’”

Perspective-taking

I must admit that my ability to imagine other people’s perspectives is very weak as I’m an introvert and I don’t practice perspective-taking a lot in real life. I always get stuck in my own perspective so I find myself not so helpful to others. Once upon a time, my boyfriend at the time asked me to help him to do his individual essay but I just promised him to help with the proofreading. He then asked another friend to finish it for him near the deadline. Since then, he broke up with me. This relationship let me realize that he is a matcher and I am not a giver. I failed to put his interest over mine and he failed to prioritize our relationship over his study. What if both of us are otherish givers considering our partner’s thoughts and interests to find ways that satisfy others without sacrificing our own interests?

Seeking advice

Adam suggests us to ask for advice, which is a form of powerless communication showing our vulnerability. In his opinion, advice-seeking has 4 benefits: learning, perspective taking, commitment, and flattery. For example, when I ask my senior how to get a pay rise, he will give suggestions for my situation (engage in perspective-taking) and help me if he is a giver (commitment). I will take new information (learning) from him and give appreciation (flattery) to him. This whole process of seeking advice is more like prompting the adviser to be a giver. It literally gives the adviser a chance to give.

The 100-hour rule of volunteering

In the book, Adam also mentions the 100-hour rule of volunteering — the optimal hour to give without burning out. It’s just two hours a week if we break down 100 hours a year. Research shows that happiness increased when people performed all five giving acts or volunteer work in a single day rather than doing one a day. And if you are burning out, you can recharge your energy by shifting your giving to a new domain where your contributions showing visible impacts.

Seeing everyone as talented

Adam Grant believes generous givers simply start by seeing everyone as talented and try to bring out the best in them. They don’t excel only at recognizing and developing talent; they’re also surprisingly good at moving on when their bets don’t work out.

There’re so many great stories about takers and givers in Adam’s book worth reading. Hope you will be willing to give more no matter big or small after reading this. If we measure success in what it has done for the people around us, being helpful to others with a sense of free choice is successful.

Happy reading!

 

 

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LOL this is funny

happiness

What makes you laugh today?

I have no idea what my facial expression looks like when I’m not looking at the mirror, until more than 2 people said to me,” You looks so serious”. What? I have been wearing a serious look all day, all months, or maybe all years? I thought I have a happy smiling face all the time. Are there fights between emotions in my brain like the movie Inside Out?

The idea that I was not LOL all the time makes me panic. Then I watch comedies, sitcoms, and funny books. I also put on a pair of funny glasses and see things from a different perspective. It turns out people laugh at my stupid face.

Life is absurd. It’s better not to take it seriously. I want you to have a good laugh as that will make me laugh too. How? Yea, how exactly? I don’t quite know, to be honest. But,  here I’ve got some funny stuff, for you to judge if they are funny enough to make you laugh.

Funny graphic memoir

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Have you ever read any weird comics from Allie Brosh‘s funny blog? I gave the book a try after Bill Gate‘s recommendation. I found it enjoyable to read and I couldn’t help laughing at her whimsical drawings and writing. Allie illustrated the anecdotes about her childhood, her dogs, her identity, her depression and her daily life in a hilarious and exaggerated way with her unique sense of humor. I love it! Life is not that boring if you see it in Allie’s way.

The Simpsons jokes

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What’s your favorite Simpsons joke? The Simpsons may seem stupid, yet I love the smart jokes that make people can’t help laughing at. I tried to hack the joke writing secrets. Yes, I tried a bit, not hard. After listening to the audiobook of Springfield Confidential, I have a bit more ideas about how the Simpsons writers work: they use simple language to talk about the moment of shit and put a surprise at the end. 

The Simpsons

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The British sense of humor 

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The British sense of humor is more sarcastic and pessimistic. James Acaster’s Classic Scrapes is a good example, telling his autobiographical stories in a comedian way. He’s hilarious. You can definitely feel that when he speaks, not to mention his funny stand-up shows.

Happy reading & laughing!